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Hydrogels, Methods of Making Hydrogels, Methods of Using Hydrogels, and Methods of Isolating, Trapping, Attracting, and/or Killing Cancer Cells


Stanford Reference:

08-379


Abstract


Stanford researchers have developed a novel, highly localized and low-toxicity therapeutic approach to reducing or preventing cancer cell dissemination, metastasis and recurrence. This invention describes hydrogel-based implants containing cancer cell killing compounds, designed and derivatized to selectively attract, sequester, and kill residual cancer cells for extended periods of time.

The implanted hydrogel can be formed and/or implanted within a void in the tissue left at the site of tumor excision, ideally at the time of surgery, and will be modified to display bioactive adhesion molecules and to release chemotactic agents to which the cancer cells of interest respond (by migrating into the gel). Other future applications can include the controlled release of analgesics or opiates to reduce patient discomfort after surgery, and the release of antibiotics to prevent or treat post-surgical infections. These approaches could also be used in tandem, with multiple therapeutic drugs being released from the same device.

Applications


  • Anti-cancer therapeutics:
    • To slow, limit, or prevent metastasis in early stage cancer
    • Supplement traditional surgical, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy treatments to prevent cancer metastasis and tumor recurrence
  • Drug delivery: The gel implant can also be used to control release of analgesics or opiates to reduce patient discomfort after surgery, and the release of antibiotics to prevent or treat post-surgical infections

Advantages


  • Low toxicity, good biocompatibility
  • Highly localized drug delivery
  • Can be implanted during surgery, reducing need for additional invasive surgery
  • May aid in patient healing after surgery

Publications



Stage of Research


Work is currently ongoing with a team of 7 researchers at Stanford. Created most of the necessary elements of the hydrogel scaffold system, which is based on protein polymers that can be either chemically and/or enzymatically crosslinked in situ under mild conditions. Created star PEGs and also commercially obtained 8-arm PEGs that could be used to crosslink the hydrogels and increase their biostability while reducing immunogenicity. Synthesized PLGA-based microparticles that encapsulate chemoattractants, which are known to have chemotactic (attractive) effects on certain migratory cancer cells. Grown cancer cells both on and within our hydrogels, with cells showing good adhesion and gels having low to zero cytotoxicity.

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Innovators & Portfolio



Patent Status



Date Released

 2/26/2015
 

Licensing Contact


Irit Gal, Senior Licensing Associate
650-723-1586 (Business)
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Related Keywords


therapeutic: drug delivery   therapeutic: anticancer   cancer drug delivery   cancer drug therapy   08-379   
 

   

  

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S08-379 Hydrogels