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Nitrogen Doped Aluminum Oxide Resistive Random Access Memory


Stanford Reference:

11-055


Abstract


Stanford researchers in Electrical Engineering have developed a nitrogen-doped aluminum oxide Resistive Access Memory (RRAM). The memory cell requires no forming and uses ultra-low voltage and current. The cell is capable of multi-bit storage, reliable for over 100K switching cycles and 10 years retention at 125 degrees C.

Ongoing Research
The inventors are currently conducting studies to improve film properties and evaluate other deposition methods.


Applications


  • Non-volatile memory
  • Potential replacement for Flash

Advantages


  • Compatible with CMOS
  • Simple process
  • Low voltage, low power operations
  • Demonstrated reliability
  • Potential multi-bit storage per cell

Publications


  • Wanki Kim, Sung Il Park, Zhiping Zhang, Young Yang-Liauw, Deepak Sekar, H.-S. Philip Wong and S. Simon Wong, “Forming-Free Nitrogen-Doped Aluminum Oxide RRAM with Sub-Microamps Programming Current” presented at the 2011 Symposia on VLSI Technology and Circuits, 14 June 2011.

Innovators & Portfolio



Patent Status



Date Released

 1/30/2013
 

Licensing Contact


Kirsten Leute, Senior Associate
kleute@stanford.edu
1-650-723-4374 (Business)

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